Question

What makes a good logo design?

Answer

Here at evolve we believe that the lines between digital and marketing are constantly overlapping, and the opportunities for greater visibility to more diverse audiences has also increased. At the core every business logo must encompass the core values, the USP (unique selling point) and should also conjure up its central branding messages in an instant.

When people try to imagine an example of a good logo, they tend to think about the most recognisable examples: Coca Cola, Apple, Nike, IBM, Mercedes Benz, McDonalds; logos that everyone recognises. The fact is these logos have evolved over time with the companies in question and the one thing you tend to find with the evolution of logos like these is that they get a whole lot simpler.

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What makes a good logo design?

Answer

Here at evolve we believe that the lines between digital and marketing are constantly overlapping, and the opportunities for greater visibility to more diverse audiences has also increased. At the core every business logo must encompass the core values, the USP (unique selling point) and should also conjure up its central branding messages in an instant.

When people try to imagine an example of a good logo, they tend to think about the most recognisable examples: Coca Cola, Apple, Nike, IBM, Mercedes Benz, McDonalds; logos that everyone recognises. The fact is these logos have evolved over time with the companies in question and the one thing you tend to find with the evolution of logos like these is that they get a whole lot simpler.

What does a good logo look like and why?

Memorable logos like the ones mentioned were not just the result of great designers with exceptional talents and technology. What made them iconic is their simplicity, their distinctive design, their memorability and their versatility. Here are a few key details when looking for and creating good logo design:

1) Simplicity:

Complicated and busy logos soon get ignored. They send mix messages about your company’s brand and will fail to engage your audience. What’s expected is simple stream-line design that catches the attention of customer and is quickly remembered by them. Creativity is everywhere, not just in other logos, so if your company is looking at logo design, first see what inspires you and see if it work with your brand.

2) Distinctive Design:

Take a look at your competitors and see what design is being used for your market. Although it is tempting to mimic, please don’t. Original and unique designs that work in conjunction with your brand will set you apart from your competitors, and help customers recognise you from everyone else.

3) Versatility:

Logos must come in all shapes and sizes. From giant billboards to office stationary, the logo must remain clear, and legible( think Apple’s logo in digital form and lit-up on the back of  their products).

4) Great logos should be Appropriate:

Logos must target the right audience and be appropriate to what you’re trying to sell, (think brewer’s logos versus kid’s brand logos). That doesn’t mean it should conform either to what it is expected of your industry.

And finally all good logos should be timeless.  They don’t suffer from local trends and typography or new ‘cool’ fonts. When designing, all business should ask themselves, ‘Will this logo look good in ten or twenty years?’ Remember, before you begin planning and designing a logo, you must ask a few questions: ‘What style and tone do I want to communicate? And if so, ‘Does this Logo work with my brand?’

Begin by looking at your company objectively, thinking about the customer and sketching out a few ideas that will illustrate this, is a good place to start. All great logos began with a pencil and paper so before you run off to work with the next best design software go back to basics, and most of all start simple.